VW MK1 GOLF PARTS & ACCESSORIES

1975-1983

YOUR ONE STOP SHOP FOR VOLKSWAGEN MK1 GOLF PARTS

 

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THE FACE THAT STARTED IT ALL...

The unmistakable red grill of the Mk1 Golf GTI

Quality VW Golf Mk1 Accessories and Spare Parts

We have built our reputation on supplying only genuine parts for VW Golf Mk1 and the finest reproductions available, as well as a wide selection of the best aftermarket parts from the worlds leading manufacturers and we are constantly sourcing new products to add to our incredible range. To find the VW Golf Mk1 parts you require, simply select the appropriate area of the car from the categories above. Our online store includes hundreds of exploded diagrams and photographs to help you identify which parts for VW Golf Mk1 you need… And remember, if you have a query about any of the Volkswagen Golf Mk1 parts we stock – or if you can’t find the part you require – just click on the ‘live chat’ button or call our sales team on 01273 444 000 at any time during UK business hours

VW JETTA Mk1 OWNERS

Certain Mk1 Jetta parts are model specific and will be listed as ‘VW Jetta Mk1 only’. Where no separate parts for Mk1 Jetta are shown, the standard VW Golf Mk1 parts and accessories are usually correct.

VW Beetle History

History of the VW Mk1 Golf

Despite popular belief, the Golf isn't named after the game, an understandable mistake to make when you think of the Polo, but is in fact named after a wind, the word being German for the Gulf stream, the rest of the VW range at the time followed suit with Scirocco, Jetta and Passat all sharing the same naming convention. Another common misconception is that the Beetle is VW's best selling model, again this is incorrect, with the Golf having achieved sales of over 25 million, by 2007, being the 3rd best selling car in the world.

Officially introduced in May 1974, the Guigiaro designed Mk1 Golf (codenamed Typ 17) was set to be Volkswagen’s replacement for the legendary Beetle, however the Golf wasn't VW's first attempt at trying to replace the Beetle, but all the predecessors had fallen way short of achieving the production figures set by the Beetle. This time though, the two designs couldn't have been more different, the Beetle had been of a traditional chassis and body two piece construction, the Golf was a monocoque design (meaning the body and chassis were one in the same).

The Beetle had employed fairly basic suspension based around a beam axle at the front, whereas the Golf used MacPherson struts (as designed by Earle S MacPherson, Chevrolet's head of engineering in the late 1940's). The Golf used a unique trailing arm Independent rear suspension; the Beetle on the other hand relied on a swing axle, then latterly a form of Independent rear unit. In terms of propulsion, the Beetle had utilized an air-cooled flat four mounted in the rear of the car, hung off the gearbox, behind the axle driving the rear wheels, conversely the Golf made use of a water-cooled inline 4 cylinder, transversely mounted ahead of the front axle, driving the front wheels. This design allowed maximum use of the space created within the footprint of the car.

The passenger compartment was positively spacious by comparison to the Beetle (as well as the rest of the Golfs peers), and luggage capacity was leagues ahead, with the option to be extended further into the cabin by folding the rear seats down. If ever a car was going to the follow on the legacy of the Beetle, the little Golf was certainly well prepared for it


 

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